If you are not yet protected against COVID-19, and you have had contact with someone with COVID-19, you may also become ill. This applies in the following situations:

  • If someone in your household tests positive for COVID-19.
  • If you are a close contact of someone who has COVID-19. 
  • If you have received a notification via the CoronaMelder app.

Whether you need to be quarantined depends on whether or not you are already protected against COVID-19. If you tested positive for COVID-19, you must always go into isolation – even if you are already protected against COVID-19.

More information about isolation.

When am I protected against COVID-19?

You are protected against COVID-19:

  • If it is more than 14 days since you received a second COVID-19 vaccination with the AstraZeneca, Pfizer or Moderna vaccine; or
  • If it is more than 14 days since you received one vaccination with one of these vaccines, and you had previously had COVID-19; or
  • If it is more than 28 days since you received one COVID-19 vaccination with the Janssen vaccine; or
  • If you had COVID-19 within the past 6 months (180 days).

If you are protected against COVID-19, you do not need to quarantine. However, it is important to monitor your health closely. If you develop symptoms that could indicate COVID-19, then you should always get tested by the Municipal Public Health Service (GGD). Never use a self-test if you have symptoms.

If you are a household member of someone who has COVID-19, the recommendation is to get tested, even if you are protected against COVID-19. You can have no symptoms and still be contagious. Get tested by the GGD 5 days after your last close contact with your household member who has COVID-19.

I am not protected against COVID-19. Do I need to quarantine now?

If you are not yet protected against COVID-19, and you have had contact with someone with COVID-19, you must go into quarantine. That means you stay home. More information about the rules you must follow while in quarantine is available on the LCI page about quarantine and isolation. Children under 4 years old do not need to be quarantined if they have had contact with someone who has COVID-19.

Types of contacts

If you are not yet protected against COVID-19, and you have contact with someone for an extended period of time, or have been in very close proximity to someone who has the virus, you are more likely to become infected. During source and contact tracing, the GGD reviews what types of contact you had during the period that you were contagious, and what you should do in each case.  

People who have had contact with someone who has COVID-19 are classified into two groups:    

  • Household members: The people who live in the same household as you, who you often spend time with for more than 15 minutes at a distance of less than 1.5 meters. 
  • Close contacts
    • Someone, other than your household members, who you spent time with for more than 15 minutes at a distance of less than 1.5 meters. Or someone who you spent time with for more than 15 minutes at a distance of less than 1.5 meters, cumulatively within a 24-hour period. 
    • Someone who you spent time with for less than 15 minutes at a distance of less than 1.5 meters, with a major risk of infection. For example, if someone coughed in your face, or if you had physical contact such as hugging or kissing.

Testing during quarantine – household member or close contact?

If you are not protected against COVID-19, you must go into quarantine. That means you stay home, and you have to get tested by the Municipal Public Health Service (GGD). When you need to get tested depends on whether you are a household member or close contact of someone who has COVID-19.

Children under 4 years old do not have to go into quarantine. However, it is important to monitor your child’s health closely. If your child develops symptoms, even if the symptoms are mild, keep your child home and immediately schedule an appointment for testing by the GGD.

Household members

Do you live in the same household as someone who has COVID-19? And are you not protected against COVID-19? Then get tested immediately. By testing people immediately, we can detect new infections earlier. Even if you do not have any symptoms (yet), you should still get tested. You may only leave the house to get tested. If the test result is positive, then you have COVID-19. In that case, go into isolation

Have you been tested within five days of your last contact with someone with COVID-19, and was the test result negative? Then stay in quarantine. Get tested again on day five. This is to see if you can be released from quarantine. If the test result is negative for COVID-19, you may be released from quarantine.

Close contacts

Are you a close contact of someone who has COVID-19? And are you not protected against COVID-19? Then get tested on the fifth day of quarantine. If the test result is negative for COVID-19, you may be released from quarantine. If the result is positive, then you have COVID-19 and must go into isolation.

Leaving quarantine early after testing negative: no contact with vulnerable people

As a precaution, avoid contact with vulnerable people until the 10th day after your last contact with someone who has COVID-19 – even if you tested negative for COVID-19. Vulnerable people have a higher risk of becoming seriously ill or dying if they are infected with the virus. Do you work in healthcare or in contact with vulnerable people? Consult your employer to discuss your options. 

Quarantine when arriving from abroad if you are not yet protected

If you are not yet protected against COVID-19, and are travelling to the Netherlands from a country with a high risk of COVID-19 (orange or red travel advisory), you will be required to show a negative COVID-19 test when you return. You may also have to go into quarantine. See Government.nl for the latest information on travel and quarantine.

After quarantine

Even after quarantine, the following rules apply:  stay 1,5 metres from others, wash your hands regularly with soap and water, cough and sneeze into your elbow, and get tested by the GGD if you have symptoms that could indicate COVID-19.

Videos

Video Quarantine: what does it mean?

Video Quarantine: what does it mean?

Video Isolation: what does it mean?

Video Isolation: what does it mean?

Isolation: what does it mean?

I have COVID-19 and have to go into isolation

If your test result is positive, then you have COVID-19. In that case, go into isolation.  By self-isolating, you help to prevent the people around you from becoming infected. Going into isolation means that you stay home in your own separate room, and sleep there as well. Other household members should not enter your room. Avoid all contact with your household members. 

When you are allowed out of isolation depends on your symptoms and health. During source and contact tracing, the GGD will talk to you about which situation applies to you.

Read more about the rules to follow while isolating at home.

Are you seriously ill and in need of medical assistance? Call your GP or the out-of-hours medical centre immediately. 

Frequently asked questions about quarantine and COVID-19

Is it possible for people to develop symptoms even after testing negative for COVID-19 on day 5?

A few of the close contacts identified from source and contact tracing only developed symptoms 7 days after their last contact with a person who has COVID-19. You can stop quarantining if you test negative for COVID-19 on day 5. However, it is still important to keep track of whether you develop symptoms.